fbpx
Cracking the Code: Unraveling Magento's CPU Overload Issue and the Search for an Effective Fix

Cracking the Code: Unraveling Magento’s CPU Overload Issue and the Search for an Effective Fix

Cracking the Code: Unraveling Magento's CPU Overload Issue and the Search for an Effective Fix

With successive versions of Magento experiencing persistent performance issues triggering high CPU load, the culprit has been identified as a query related to the search_term cache. This query, an integral part of the Magento 2.3.0 update, is consuming a significant amount of database resources when executed repeatedly, particularly on sites with millions of search terms. Our investigation seeks to unravel this complex issue, exploring potential solutions that include indexing the search_query table, utilizing elastic-search, and fine-tuning the problematic query by removing the controversial DISTINCT operator.

Demystifying the CPU Overload Issue in Magento 2.3 and Beyond

The crux of the CPU overload issue goes back to the release of Magento 2.3. This update heralded a sudden increase in database CPU load, which cast a long shadow on the performance of the e-commerce platform. At the heart of this increased CPU load was a more intangible, yet crucial, factor—the search_term cache. Introduced in the 2.3.0 update, this feature was designed to enhance website search functionality. Unfortunately, it ended up being a proverbial wolf in sheep's clothing.

The problem became more noticeable as the search_query table, a core component of this cache, grew in size. This table holds all the search terms used on a Magento-based site. The larger the table, the longer the query takes to complete, leading to a significant toll on the CPU load. From Magento 2.3 through Magento 2.4.5-p4, the performance issue has repeatedly reared its head, affecting both the admin panel and search request performance.

The Search_Term Cache: A Necessary Evil in Magento's Operation

The search_term cache is a fundamental part of Magento's operation, created to bolster search results. However, it has morphed into a necessary evil that is too intricate to ignore. It's like a labyrinth that Magento users must traverse, affecting their experience and the overall performance of the platform. The cache problem is especially pronounced on larger, more active sites, where millions of search terms are stored, putting undue strain on the database and causing slow queries.

The query itself, designed to select the count of distinct search terms with non-zero results, has proven to be more of a hindrance than a help. This issue even persists within the latest 2.4-develop branch, revealing its problematic nature across various Magento versions. The query is executed repeatedly, resulting in high CPU usage and a noticeable decline in site performance—a common pain point for the Magento community.

Unveiling the Query Culprit: A Deep Dive into the Search_Term Cache Problem

Taking a closer look at the query, one can pinpoint the issue to a singular culprit: the DISTINCT operator. This operator, which is used to select distinct search terms with non-zero results, has proven to be a performance dampener. It is unnecessary and redundant, considering the search_query table already has a unique constraint on query_text and store_id.

Removing the DISTINCT operator from the query has shown a significant reduction in query duration. This alteration, while simple, leads to a dramatic improvement in CPU load. However, the problem goes beyond this singular fix. The search_query table continues to grow with usage, and the DISTINCT operator, while a significant factor, is not the only issue affecting performance.

The complexity of the search_term cache problem demands a multi-pronged approach. The investigation continues, but the onus is on Magento to resolve this persistent issue, which is still relevant and affects Magento versions up to 2.4.5-p4. As we delve deeper into this issue in subsequent sections, we will explore potential fixes such as indexing the search_query table, using elastic-search for all search-related operations, and modifying the query.

Exploring Potential Fixes: Indexing, Elastic-Search, and Query Modification

The search for a resolution to Magento's CPU overload issue necessitates a deep dive into potential solutions, each offering its unique merits and drawbacks. Firstly, indexing the search_query table has been put forward as a viable remedy. This is particularly relevant when considering that the larger the search_query table becomes, the longer the query takes to execute. With the table swelling in size with usage, indexing could significantly improve query duration.

However, indexing is not without its challenges. Decisions must be made on which columns to index and identifying the combination that will provide the fastest search time can be a complex process. Furthermore, indexing can increase the storage space required for the database, potentially offsetting the performance gain.

The second potential solution, the utilization of elastic-search for all search-related operations, is seen as a robust alternative. This solution would bypass the issue entirely, circumventing the need to execute the problematic query. However, elastic-search may not always be applicable depending on the specific environment or configuration Magento is running in.

Lastly, query modification, specifically removing the condition "num_results > 0," is reported to significantly reduce query duration, providing a simpler and more immediate solution.

Deconstructing the Query: The Impact of the DISTINCT Operator

Upon closer examination, the DISTINCT operator in the query has come under scrutiny as a potential performance hog. This operator, which selects the count of distinct search terms with non-zero results, can strain the database when executed repeatedly on sites with a high frequency of search terms.

The solution? Removing the DISTINCT operator from the query. This modification significantly improves performance, providing a quick and effective fix for the CPU overload issue. Furthermore, the DISTINCT operator appears to be redundant in this context, as the search_query table already has a unique constraint on query_text and store_id.

From Issue Identification to Resolution: The Path Forward for Magento Performance Optimization

While the issue has been identified and potential solutions proposed, Magento's CPU overload problem requires further investigation and refinement from the Magento team. The issue persists in the latest versions of Magento, affecting both the admin panel and search requests, with no definitive fix yet identified.

Therefore, the path forward must involve a multifaceted and collaborative approach. This includes removing the DISTINCT operator from the queries within the Query Collection, considering an index on the search_query table, and exploring the use of elastic-search for search operations.

Simultaneously, preventative measures should be taken to ensure future performance degradation is minimized. This could involve asynchronous insertion of search terms in batches, or even reconsidering the need for tracking search terms entirely.

In conclusion, while Magento's CPU overload issue presents a significant challenge, the combined efforts of dedicated professionals and an engaged community offer a clear path forward. The endpoint? A more efficient, effective, and user-friendly Magento for all.

In conclusion, resolving the CPU overload issue in Magento's recent versions necessitates a collaborative, multi-faceted approach. This includes:

  • Removing the DISTINCT operator from the queries within the Query Collection to reduce unneeded strain on the database.
  • Considering an index on the search_query table to improve the speed of search operations and query execution.
  • Exploring the use of elastic-search for all search-related operations, thereby bypassing the problematic query entirely.

Additionally, preventative measures should be incorporated to curb future performance degradation. These measures could involve asynchronous insertion of search terms in batches, or even reconsidering the need for tracking search terms entirely. The goal? To ensure a more efficient, user-friendly Magento for all, free from unneeded complexities and performance hindrances. With the dedicated efforts of professionals and an engaged community, we have a clear path towards an optimized and effective Magento performance.

YouTube
LinkedIn
LinkedIn
Share